plant health

Plant Health

Assessing the health of your plant

If your plant is dehydrated, it may not be growing as fast as you would like it too. Its leaves may appear brown and dry at the edges, with some showing a slight yellow tinge. Over-hydration symptoms include leaves with soft, rotten patches and root rot.

Use water that is at room temperature

When watering indoor and outdoor plants, try to use water that is room temperature, around 20° C. To determine the temperature of the water, either use a thermometer, or leave the water to stand after you pour it.

Water that is too high a temperature can cause both plant shock and root damage – both of these can have a detrimental effect on your house plants.

Water that is too cold on the other hand can cause dormancy, which will stump any present and future greenery.

Use a hand-held moisture meter to ensure hydration levels in your soil. Moisture metres are a great asset to those who wish to care for their plants in the best possible way. They are the most accurate way to judge the hydration of your plants. This unique mechanism examines the underlying soil to give an extremely efficient moisture reading. Moisture metres are available online, in garden centres and in various supermarkets and department stores.

Select pots that have good drainage

Drainage is hugely important when it comes to plant care. To avoid overwatering your plants, it's a good idea to purchase plant pots with drainage holes at the base of the pot. Metal, glass and plastic plant pots tend to absorb much less water than clay or ceramic pots. If the pot you have chosen doesn't have drainage holes, simply place a smaller plastic container inside the vessel.

Plant Health

Assessing the health of your plant

If your plant is dehydrated, it may not be growing as fast as you would like it too. Its leaves may appear brown and dry at the edges, with some showing a slight yellow tinge. Over-hydration symptoms include leaves with soft, rotten patches and root rot.

Use water that is at room temperature

When watering indoor and outdoor plants, try to use water that is room temperature, around 20° C. To determine the temperature of the water, either use a thermometer, or leave the water to stand after you pour it.

Water that is too high a temperature can cause both plant shock and root damage – both of these can have a detrimental effect on your house plants.

Water that is too cold on the other hand can cause dormancy, which will stump any present and future greenery.

Use a hand-held moisture meter to ensure hydration levels in your soil. Moisture metres are a great asset to those who wish to care for their plants in the best possible way. They are the most accurate way to judge the hydration of your plants. This unique mechanism examines the underlying soil to give an extremely efficient moisture reading. Moisture metres are available online, in garden centres and in various supermarkets and department stores.

Select pots that have good drainage

Drainage is hugely important when it comes to plant care. To avoid overwatering your plants, it's a good idea to purchase plant pots with drainage holes at the base of the pot. Metal, glass and plastic plant pots tend to absorb much less water than clay or ceramic pots. If the pot you have chosen doesn't have drainage holes, simply place a smaller plastic container inside the vessel.